Storm water

About Storm Water


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When it rains or snow melts, water that is not absorbed into the ground, intercepted by vegetation or evaporated flows into surface waters such as rivers, streams, canals, lakes, creeks and coastal waters.

Surface water is a precious resource, especially in Texas because it is the primary source for most of our supplied waters, and so you should always remember that City of Celina's storm water runoff will eventually be a future drinking water or support an aquatic life.

As the City grows and develops the amount of storm water runoffs and tendency of pollution increases due to increased impervious surfaces and water polluting activities. Consequently without proper infrastructure and management, flooding and surface water pollution may be rampant.

As a result the City is considering the implementation of a storm water utility fee (pdf) to provide more effective storm water management throughout Celina. The utility fee will help to protect our community and the environment from flooding, creek erosion, damage to aquatic habitat, and pollution of our streams and lakes.

Stormwater Corner

What you should know about stormwater

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Storm drains contain runoff that is not treated by the City of Celina prior to entering our natural streams.

Sanitary sewers, however, convey wastewater from houses, businesses and industries to wastewater treatment plants. Storm drains are a completely different system than the sanitary sewers. Anything that enters the storm drain system is discharged untreated into the waterbodies.



Stormwater is water from precipitation that flows across the ground and pavement  due to rain or snowmelt (also known as stormwater runoff). The water may seep into the ground or flow into the City’s stormwater drainage system. This system includes road-side gutters, ditches, streams, ponds and drainage pipes throughout the City. All City runoff goes into our natural creeks: Doe Branch Creek, Little Elm Creek, Wilson Creek and Honey Creek. The natural streams have a small amount of baseflow that is caused by groundwater recharge and high water tables; the baseflow is relatively clean. When it rains, the baseflow is supplemented by stormwater runoff from parking lots and city streets. The baseflow is relatively clean groundwater that flows at a low velocity. Stormwater runoff tends to pickup garbage, debris, sediment, fertilizers, automobile fluids and other pollutants; stormwater runoff is relatively dirty and will harm the fish and other wild­ life living in the natural creeks if care is not taken.

Storm drains contain runoff that is not treated by the City of Celina prior to entering our natural streams.

Sanitary sewers, however, convey wastewater from houses, businesses and industries to wastewater treatment plants. Storm drains are a completely different system than the sanitary sewers. Anything that enters the storm drain system is discharged untreated into the waterbodies.