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Wastewater

Things to Know About Sewer

The Celina Wastewater Department maintains the wastewater collection and treatment system which includes more than 30 miles of wastewater collection lines, eleven lift stations, 35 pumps, and a wastewater treatment plant with a capacity of 500,000 gallons per day.

The wastewater department strives to provide the best service possible. The department is currently finishing upgrades to the wastewater treatment plant that include additional sludge drying capability, new air piping, and a new waste activated sludge station. In addition to this important project, the City of Celina has recently installed a major trunk sewer line that will allow us to divert up to 200,000 gallons of wastewater flow per day away from our existing plant and into the Upper Trinity Regional Water District’s regional collection system. We believe that these important projects will position us well to handle both current and anticipated flow.

As Celina grows so will the wastewater department, which currently consists of three full time employees.  We are preparing for upcoming growth by proactively identifying and planning for future wastewater infrastructure.  In addition we proactively search for lines that need maintenance or replacement and schedule repairs promptly. Recently the wastewater department completed a smoke testing project in which collection lines were tested, problem areas identified, and repairs were scheduled. During this project the department tested approximately 40 percent of the collection infrastructure, identified more than 80 problem areas and has repaired more than 30 of those deficiencies to date. This project has significantly decreased inflow and infiltration of rainwater into the collection system.

As the city grows and adds more personnel and equipment we will continue to be proactive with repair and maintenance, but we also need your help to prevent costly damage to the wastewater system.

Here are a few proactive tips on how you can help us to prevent costly repairs and overflows.

  1. Remove oil and grease from all dishes and pans before washing. Once cooled, scrape or wipe off excess grease.
  2. Once grease or cooking oil has cooled, pour into covered collection containers. Never pour oil and grease down the drain.
  3. Cover kitchen sink drains with catch baskets (strainers) and empty into the trash can as needed.
  4. Don‘t rinse off oil and grease from pots and pans with hot water. When the water cools the grease will congeal and could cause a backup. Instead wipe the grease off with a paper towel, dispose of the paper towel in your regular garbage, then wash.
  5. Scrape food scraps from dishes into a trash can to avoid using your garbage disposal.
  6. Used cooking oil can be harmful to your sewer. Why not recycle it? Visit www.FryOiltoFuel.com or www.ceasethegreasentx.com for more information.
  7. While many "flushable" items (baby wipes) may not clog your pipes, they can easily clog lift station pumps resulting in costly repairs and increasing the potential for sewer overflows. Many manufacturers claim these so-called "flushable" items biodegrade and are sewer and septic safe, but the reality is that they usually arrive at the treatment plant intact causing expensive damage to motors and pumps. The City of Celina highly encourages you to dispose of these items with your regular garbage.

When you put cooking waste like foods, oil, and grease (FOG) down the drain it clings to the sides of your sewer pipes and can cause clogs in your lines, which may result in an expensive visit from the plumber. Grease can also plug the city's main sewer lines and make it harder to treat wastewater. The cost of cleaning and repairs contributes to the rates that you pay for sewer service. Clogs can also cause sewer back-ups which are considered a hazard to the public health and the environment.

If you would like more information please feel free to contact us. We also offer information on proper pharmaceutical disposal and a variety of other topics.

For further information sanitary sewer overflow prevention please visit: www.ceasethegrease.com